Cookie Needle Book

Inspired by a notions swap, I baked up a cute little chocolate chip cookie needle book!  You could easily change the pattern to suit whatever flavor cookies you like:  chocolate sandwich cookies, sugar cookies, etc.

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Supplies:
Worsted Weight Yarn, Small amounts of Tan and Brown
3.5 / E crochet hook
Felt
Glue
Sewing machine or hand sewing supplies

Pattern note:  2scinc means do 2 sc in the same stitch to increase by 1

Cookies (make 2):
Working in a spiral without joining, starting with tan:
Magic Loop
6 sc in loop (6 sc)
2scinc around (12 sc)
[sc, 2scinc] repeat around (18 sc)
[sc, sc, 2scinc] repeat around (24 sc)
[sc, sc, sc, 2scinc] repeat around (30 sc)
[sc, sc, sc, sc, 2scinc] repeat around (36 sc)
Finish Off.  Sew in ends.
Embroider chocolate chips using brown yarn.

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Filling:
Using template, cut two pieces of felt.
Hand or machine sew two felts together along the center line.
Glue or sew outside felt pages to wrong side of cookie pieces.

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Voila!  Now you have a cookie needle book!

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August 10, 2013. Tags: , , , , , , . Crochet Pattern, Sewing. 4 comments.

Learning the lucet!

As a lover of fiber arts, I want to try it all!   Knitting, crocheting, weaving, spinning, dying, just to name a few!  This includes developing even more obscure talents, like making lucet cords.  What the heck is a lucet you might ask?  (I did!)  A lucet is a type of braiding fork that dates as far back as the viking era and produces a square cord, not completely dissimilar to its rounder cousin, the i-cord.  I started off with a lovely little lucet from StichDiva.com and this youtube video.

One interesting thing about lucet making is the tension isn’t controlled by the size of one’s lucet fork.  This is a lot different from a knitting or crocheting perspective, where the size of your needles or hook helps control the size of the stitches.  On a lucet, it’s how hard you pull the yarn during the braiding process that makes your cord tighter or looser.

Always keeping the cord centered between the two fork prongs, you have to pull to tension after each wrap of the yarn:

lucetpull

And depending how hard you pull, you end up with different results:

lucettension

So once you’ve made a lovely lucet cord, what do you do with it?  Well, it can be all kinds of things:  drawstrings, bracelets, necklaces, scarves, embroidery for costumes, a jump rope, a noose…. okay, maybe not those last two.  But basically, anywhere you might use an i-cord, you can use a lucet cord as well!

August 2, 2013. Tags: , , , , . Projects. 2 comments.